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Customary Adoption

California Indian Legal Services

California Indian Legal Services is the first Indian-controlled law firm organized to provide specialized legal representation to Indians and Indian tribes. CILS provides free or low-cost representation on those matters that fall within priorities set by the Board of Trustees.

The principle office is in Escondido, CA and serves Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Ventura Counties. There are also offices in Bishop, Eureka and Sacramento.

 


Customary Adoption Talking Points and FAQs

With permission from the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians resources and information about customary adoption are provided here. Assembly Bill 1325, allows tribal customary adoption for American Indian children in foster care. This law went into effect on July 1, 2010. This fact sheet provides talking point and answers to frequently-asked questions about customary adoption and AB1325.



Fact Sheet for County Social Workers

This fact sheet provides basic information on customary adoption and AB1325 for county social workers. This information is shared with permission from the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians.


National Indian Child Welfare Association Customary Adoption

The National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA) and the Dave Thomas Foundation have developed a national clearinghouse for tribal adoption issues. The aim of this web page is to help connect tribal communities and non-Indian adoption communities in serving the best interests of Indian children and families involved in adoption.


Sample Customary Adoption Order Version 1

This sample customary adoption order can be used as a template for cases involving customary adoption per AB1325. This information is shared with permission from the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians.


Sample Customary Adoption Order Version 2

This sample customary adoption order can be used as a template for customary adoption per AB1325. This information is shared with permission from the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians.


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