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Adam Osuna on the Rez

(3 minutes)

Erwin Osuna and his younger brother, Adam, grew up on the Rincon Indian Reservation until they were taken in by a white foster family in Julian, CA. Here Adam discusses his childhood, his experiences as a foster child, and life on the reservation.


American Indian Early Childhood Education

This webpage provides a description of early childhood education projects for American Indians, which are designed to assist with reading-language arts, math, and self-esteem for American Indian children in prekindergarten through grade four.


American Indian Enhancement Toolkit

The American Indian Enhancement Project is an effort of the
California Disproportionality Project, a Breakthrough Series Collaborative (BSC) resourced through the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the California Department of Social Services, Casey Family Programs, and the Stuart Foundation. In collaboration with Administrative Office of the Courts, California Social Work Education Center, Child and Family Policy Institute of California, California Child Welfare Co-Investment Partnership, the National Resource Center for Tribes, Tribal STAR, and Shenandoah Films.

Dedicated to all the American Indian/Alaska Native children and families in California.


American Indian Library Association

This organization is working to improve library and information services for American Indians.


Bench Handbook Indian Child Welfare Act

This Bench Handbook is intended to help judges navigate the challenges of notice and compliance to the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA).


Bringing Our Children Home: Long Version

Bringing Our Children Home: Long Version (18 minutes)


Bringing Our Children Home: Short Version

Bringing Our Children Home: Short Version (7 minutes)

 


Bureau of Indian Affairs

The Indian Affairs offers an extensive scope of programs that covers the entire range of federal, state and local government services. Programs administered by either Tribes or Indian Affairs through the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) and Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) include an education system, social services, natural resources management on trust lands, economic development, law enforcement and detention services, administration of tribal courts, implementation of land and water claim settlements, housing improvement, disaster relief, replacement and repair of schools, repair and maintenance of roads, bridges, dams and irrigation.


Bureau of Indian Affairs 2014 ICWA Agents

The regulations implementing the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) provide that Indian tribes may designate an agent other than the tribal chairman for service of notice of proceedings under ICWA. This notice includes the current list of designated tribal agents for service of notice.


California Geneaology

Lists genealogical information for San Bernardino tribes.


California Indian Legal Services

California Indian Legal Services is the first Indian-controlled law firm organized to provide specialized legal representation to Indians and Indian tribes. CILS provides free or low-cost representation on those matters that fall within priorities set by the Board of Trustees.

The principle office is in Escondido, CA and serves Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Ventura Counties. There are also offices in Bishop, Eureka and Sacramento.

 


Chemehuevi Indian Tribe

As part of the Great Basin Culture Area, the Chemehuevi (a Mojave term meaning “those that play with fish”), a branch of the Southern Paiute, have been persistent occupants of the Mojave Desert.


Cherokee Story of Two Wolves

This is a traditional Cherokee story of two wolves, a young boy and his grandfather.


Collaboration Matrix

This document shows the relationship between collaboration, coordination and cooperation.


Customary Adoption Talking Points and FAQs

With permission from the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians resources and information about customary adoption are provided here. Assembly Bill 1325, allows tribal customary adoption for American Indian children in foster care. This law went into effect on July 1, 2010. This fact sheet provides talking point and answers to frequently-asked questions about customary adoption and AB1325.


Customary Adoption Tribal Social Worker Fact Sheet

This fact sheet provides basic information on AB1325 for tribal ICWA social workers. This information is shared with permission from the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians.


Erwin Osuna

(4 minutes)

Erwin Osuna and his younger brother, Adam, grew up on the Rincon Indian Reservation until they were taken in by a white foster family in Julian, CA. Here Adam discusses his childhood, his experiences as a foster child, and life on the reservation.

 


FACES – Implementing the Indian Child Welfare Act

Follow the Spirit of ICWA: The American Indian Enhancement Project is an effort of the California Disproportionality Project, a Breakthrough Series Collaborative (BSC) resourced through the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the California Department of Social Services, Casey Family Programs, and the Stuart Foundation. In collaboration with Administrative Office of the Courts, California Social Work Education Center, Child and Family Policy Institute of California, California Child Welfare Co-Investment Partnership, the National Resource Center for Tribes, Tribal STAR, and Shenandoah Films.


Fact Sheet for County Social Workers

This fact sheet provides basic information on customary adoption and AB1325 for county social workers. This information is shared with permission from the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians.


Following the Spirit of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA)

This is a guide to understanding the benefits of providing culturally appropriate services to Native American families from non–federally recognized tribes within the juvenile dependency and delinquency systems.


For Future Generations: Justine

The Tribal STAR Digital Stories is contains personal accounts of being touched by the child welfare system. Justine’s Story: For Future Generations is shared from the perspective of a Tribal youth, who has been touched by state and Indian Child welfare systems, she gives advice to case managers and other youth on the journey.

After you have viewed the video, please take a moment to answer these reflection questions?

Justine mentioned receiving support from key individuals during her time in care. How did this support make a difference for Justine?

In what ways can the child welfare system support a Tribal youth’s process on connecting with their culture?


ICWA at a Glance

This resource provides a brief overview of the five provisions of ICWA that fulfill the intended purpose of the law: inquiry and notice, active efforts, proper placement, concurrent planning and qualified expert witness.


ICWA Best Practice

This resource includes some best practices to remember to support ICWA compliance when working with an Indian child.


ICWA Bias, Media and Historical Context eLearning

This eLearning course will explore how media and propaganda have affected our perceptions resulting in a bias toward American Indians. During this course you will be asked to identify three events in American history related to American Indians – and what do these events have in common?


Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel

This site includes the history, culture, tribal enterprises and other information about the Iipay of Santa Ysabel.


Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978

This document outlines the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) law as stated in the original 1978 document. The intent of ICWA is to prevent the unwarranted breakup of American Indian families, recognize tribal jurisdiction to make custody decisions involving the removal of Indian children from their homes, and establish minimum federal standards that county and/or state courts must follow when Indian children are removed from their homes and placed in foster care or adoptive homes.


The Indian Problem Agenda Both Sides

This document outlines both non-Indian and Indian agendas in relation to what was coined “the Indian Problem.”


Indian Values

This document compares traditional Indian values and all-American values.


Judicial Branch of California ICWA Resources

The Tribal/State Programs Unit of the Center for Families Children and the Courts has developed the resources on this webpage to assist those involved in these kinds of proceedings understand their legal obligations under ICWA and comply with those requirements.


Kumeyaay Nation

This site is dedicated to the promotion and preservation of Kumeyaay culture.


Kumeyaay Timeline

This document provides a detailed timeline of the Kumeyaay people from pre to post-contact with European settlers.


List of Federally Recognized Tribes 2015

This document from the Bureau of Indian Affairs lists Tribal entities within the contiguous 48 states recognized and eligible to receive services from the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs.


Morongo Band of Mission Indians

This website provides information on the history, heritage, community, Tribal government and Tribal departments of the Morongo Band of Mission Indians.


National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges

The NCJFCJ is engaging tribal courts and judges in cultural humility with an understanding that best practices in tribal courts may be different than state courts and diverse perspectives strengthen solutions.


National Indian Child Welfare Association Customary Adoption

The National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA) and the Dave Thomas Foundation have developed a national clearinghouse for tribal adoption issues. The aim of this web page is to help connect tribal communities and non-Indian adoption communities in serving the best interests of Indian children and families involved in adoption.


National Indian Child Welfare Association ICWA Information

This webpage provides information on the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) of 1978 including resources for families, ICWA technical assistance and training, NICWA and ICWA compliance, ICWA Reports and Documents and Tools for ICWA Compliance.


National Resource Center for Tribes Background and Need for ICWA

This webpage includes resource links in connection to the need for the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) and background information. It was complied by the National Child Welfare Resource Center for Tribes, a service of the Children’s Bureau and a member of the T/TA Network.


Pala Band of Mission Indians

This website will assist you in learning more about the people, history and culture of the Pala Band of Mission Indians.


Paul’s Story: Forever Hurt

The Tribal STAR Digital Stories contains personal accounts of being touched by the child welfare system. Paul’s Story: Forever Hurt is an account of a father who’s daughter was affected by both the state and Indian Child welfare systems.

After you have viewed the video, please take a moment to answer these reflection questions.

How is Paul affected by these events and decisions during this case?

What is the potential effect of events and decisions on Paul’s daughter?

What role does culture play in this example?


Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians

For more than 10,000 years the Pechanga people have called the Temecula Valley home. See this website for more information on the Pechanga history, culture, government and economy with a focus on the past, present and future.


Proverb of Black Elk

Thoughts about the circle from Black Elk, an Ogala Holy Man.


Proverb of Chief Joseph

Wise words from Nez Perce leader Chief Joseph.


Proverb of Chief Seattle

Proverb of Chief Seattle, Dwamish tribe, and ancient Indian proverb with photo of baby in cradle-board.


Proverb of Louise Erdrich Ojibwe

Thoughts on the concept of Turtle Mountain Ojibwe as “keepers of the names of the earth” by Louise Erdrich.


Proverb Chief Luther Standing Bear

These words are the insight of Chief Luther Standing Bear who sees the world of nature as a library of knowledge.


Proverb of Oren Lyons Onondaga

Wise words of Oren Lyons, Onondaga Nation.


Proverbs various

Proverbs about the Indian experience from John Steinbeck and others.


Reasons Why People Do Not Claim To Be American Indian

There are many reasons why individuals do not claim their American Indian heritage. This has implications for ICWA compliance especially in the area of inquiry and noticing. This tip sheet offers social workers practice tips for inquiry and noticing those who do not claim to be American Indian.


Recommendations for Maintaining Tribal Relationships

Suggestions on this concise list include the use of creativity, patience, preparation and planning, and respect when developing and maintaining Tribal relationships.


Sample Customary Adoption Order Version 1

This sample customary adoption order can be used as a template for cases involving customary adoption per AB1325. This information is shared with permission from the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians.


Sample Customary Adoption Order Version 2

This sample customary adoption order can be used as a template for customary adoption per AB1325. This information is shared with permission from the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians.


Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians

Since time immemorial the descendants of the Soboba people are those whom have lived on and occupied the land that is presently known as the cities of San Jacinto, Hemet, Valle Vista and Winchester. See this website for more information on Sobobo history, events and economy.


Sharing Our Lived Experiences Understanding the Two-Spirit Journey

Sharing Our Lived Experiences: Eight Tips for Understanding the Two-Spirit/LGBTQ Journey for Native Youth in the Child Welfare System fact sheet is intended to assist and support Native youth who may be Two-Spirit and/or LGBTQ (lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender/questioning). Native youth in child welfare placements can experience many challenges. These include feelings of abandonment, guilt, shame, disconnection from extended family, and many feelings related to unresolved grief and loss due to multi-generational historical traumas.


Tips for Cross-Cultural Training

The aim of this tip sheet is to effectively increase understanding of the complex issues surrounding Child Welfare Services for Tribal youth by illuminating historical events and how they have shaped today’s Tribal and non-Tribal relationships. See both long and short versions.


Tribal Sovereignty and Child Welfare

Practice Tips for social workers to understanding government to government relations in ICWA cases.


Tribal STAR Judge’s Checklist

This checklist has been developed to help judges determine the best circumstances surrounding placement of a child in a non-Indian home. The intention of this list is to provide guidelines that can strengthen the potential for a successful outcome.


Tribal STAR Tips for Following Protocol

This tip sheet offers suggestion on how to follow protocol when working with Tribal Communities.


Tribal STAR Poster Girl and Boy

Tribal STAR poster featuring a young Native American girl and boy.


Tribal STAR Poster Three Boys

Tribal STAR Poster Improving Outcomes featuring three Native American boys.


Tribal Star Poster Improving Outcomes

Tribal Star Poster on Improving Outcomes featuring a photo of a Native American girl.


Tribal STAR Book List

Tribal STAR’s reference list of books related to Native American Foster Youth and people that work with Native American Foster Youth.


Wakeem’s Story: Finding Connection

The Tribal STAR Digital Stories contains personal accounts of being touched by the child welfare system. Wakeem’s Story: Finding Connection is an account of a challenged Tribal youth who is reconnecting with heritage and tribal relations.

After you have viewed the video, please take a moment to answer these reflection questions.

At what point did Phil stop being just a good social worker and become like a family to Wakeem (“his stationary point”)?

In what ways did Susan and Phil work to connect Wakeem with his culture?

Why was it important for Wakeem to be connected to services such as the Regional Center? How will this help in the future.


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